Navigator: The Spaghetti Management Syndrome

Navigator Newsletter #126
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Greg Smith, "Captain of the Ship," publishes the
Navigator
Newsletter and is President of Chart Your Course
International.

"We help businesses create GREAT places to work."
Contact: 770-860-9464

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PERSONAL NOTE FROM "THE CAPTAIN"

Is this all there is to life? Shortly after 9/11,
I interviewed a young man regarding how the event
changed his perspective on life. He said,

"If I die tomorrow, I want to make sure I am doing
a job that gives me meaning."

I am a very fortunate person. I am doing what I
want to do and am happy and satisfied with my
life. Since I was a teenager, it was clear to me
what I was going to pursue, what my career and
purpose was in life. I just took it for granted
everyone was like me. I was wrong.

The older I get the more I realize there are many
people who are unhappy with their jobs, unclear
about their purpose, and unsure where they are
heading. They are still trying to discover what
they are good at, or find something they enjoy.

Success is measured in many different ways. My
success in life is based on one simple formula —
SOAP.

Stay tuned for the complete article in a future
issue of the Navigator Newsletter.
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THE SPAGHETTI MANAGEMENT SYNDROME
Good Employees Require Good Managers

When an employee quits, many times they don't quit
the company — they quit their manager. I
validated this fact in a survey which showed in
46% of the cases the main reason people quit their
employer was because of their first-line
supervisor; a painful statistic when you consider
how difficult and expensive it is to find and
train good people. To make matters worse,
businesses are stupid to do nothing about it.

In my mind, it is an honor as well as an important
responsibility to become a manager. When I use
the word, "manager," I am not necessarily
referring to a job title, but talking about the
"role" of managing people.

A manager's job is not easy. The demands are
difficult. Many bosses are doing the jobs of two
or more people. Employees expect more; some are
plain difficult to work with.

Many businesses do a poor job selecting and
training managers. It goes without saying those
that do a good job selecting and developing their
managers will enjoy higher productivity and lower
employee turnover. However, most often the
employer is at fault for not giving them the
tools, training, and support to succeed.

Spaghetti Management Syndrome

Just because a person shows potential or has a
degree does not mean they will be good at managing
others. Many are skilled technicians, but
unfortunately are clueless on the art and science
of managing people.

Some businesses practice what I call "spaghetti
management." They pick a bunch of people, promote
them to managers, then throw them on a wall like
spaghetti, and see what sticks. This is not the
fault of the individual manager, but the
employer's. Without training and support most new
managers will fail. This is one of the main
reasons people today run like the plague to avoid
becoming supervisors and managers.

Sure, some managers are tyrants and no amount of
training is going to change them. But at least
good businesses recognize their mistakes and
provide additional training, or find the errant
manager a job somewhere else.

Good businesses place people skills as a vital
part of their performance management system. For
example, Synovus Financial has been listed in the
"Top 100 Best Places to Work" for several years.
They have a commandment that says, 'A manager's
most important role is to serve, grow, and inspire
his or her people—with no exception.' This
requirement had a positive impact on the bottom
line. Not only did their employee turnover rate
drop, but also their market capitalization grew
from $2.2 billion to $8 billion in four years.

Good Leaders Show They Care

I went into the Army after college to learn how to
be a good leader. My first boss was a great mentor
and teacher. He was an experienced veteran and a
former Special Forces medic in Vietnam. He was the
type of person who always put the needs of others
before his own interests.

As the lowest ranking member of my battalion, I
had to pull duty on the worst day of the year —
New Years Eve. I worked all day and then I was up
all night. You can imagine what mischief 500
soldiers can get in. Finally, Saturday morning
arrived and I could not wait to go home. The
phone rang; it was Joe, my boss. He wanted to know
if I had made any plans for lunch. He and his wife
had prepared something and he wanted to bring it
over to me. Today, I don't remember what the food
was, but it was a meal I will never forget.

That one small act of kindness crystallized in my
mind what leadership was about — caring for those
you lead. That act taught me more about leadership
than all the degrees and diplomas hanging on my
wall.

Here are a few suggestions to consider in your
management development program:

>Establish key competencies your managers should
possess and demonstrate.
>Have company executives share their expectations
with your managers.
>Consider using a 360-degree evaluation on top
management.
>Hold managers accountable and responsible for
retention.
>Have HR train managers on reward and recognition.
>Provide the support and tools to help managers do
their job well.
>Start measuring turnover and apply the cost to
the bottom line.
>Conduct post exit interviews to discover the real
reason employee's quit.
>Complete an individual retention profile on every
employee.
>Conduct an employee satisfaction survey at least
once a year.

Please contact us about our online and onsite
management development programs.
http://www.chartcourse.com/contactus.htm
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WORKPLACE SURVEY DATA

Workplace Stress

In a survey of 506 employed American adults, 22
percent report having been driven to tears as a
result of workplace stress.

RJC Associates ~ San Francisco

Smile!

According to a study of 80 randomly selected
individuals who participated in two simulated job
interviews, 58 percent were more likely to be
hired and 53 percent received higher salary offers
after their teeth had been whitened.

Kelton Research ~ Los Angeles

Women in the Boardroom

The overall proportion of women on the boards of
Norway's publicly listed companies is double the
level of most Western countries, according to a
new report.

Norway-26.6%
United States-13.6%
Canada-11.2%
Britain-11.8%
Australia-8.4%

Center for Corporate Diversity
Oslo, Norway

Working with Friends

A new survey finds 57 percent of 150 senior U. S.
executives say office productivity improves when
co-workers are friends outside the office.

Accountemps
Menlo Park, CA

Long Hours

According to the Working Time Around the World
report, 614.2 million workers, or approximately 22
percent of the global workforce, work for more
than 48 hours a week.

International Labour Organisation ~ Geneva

As reported in Human Resource Executive Magazine
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UPCOMING TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES

TELESEMINAR ~
DESIGNING AN EMPLOYEE RETENTION STRATEGY
Five Steps to Reduce Turnover

Thursday, October 4
3:00-4:30 p.m. EST (Atlanta time)
90 minutes/$125 per person
CD available
Register Online

Learn how to create a work environment that
attracts,keeps, and motivates your workforce.
Discover why some employees would rather work for
a good employer than leave for a pay raise. This
session will show managers, owners,supervisors,
and human resource professionals not only how to
retain their most talented performers, but also
how to transform their entire workforce into a
high-retention culture, saving organizations
countless thousands of dollars. This session is
jam packed with tips, ideas, and easy to implement
advice.

More information at:
http://www.chartcourse.com/teleseminar_retention.html
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THE INSTITUTE OF EMPLOYEE RETENTION
& JOB SATISFACTION

Thursday – January 24, 2008
World Trade Center Club
Atlanta, Georgia
8:30-4:30 p.m.
$699 each per person
$599 each for two people
$449 each for three people or more

More information at:
http://www.chartcourse.com/Employee-Retention-Workshop.html
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SELF-CONTAINED CUSTOMER SERVICE
TRAINING PROGRAM FOR FRONT-LINE EMPLOYEES

The Service First Video Library is used by
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Each Video Library Includes:

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More information at:
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BECOME A VOYAGEUR TODAY!

We have upgraded the Voyageur program providing
members with over $1,700 worth of free products
and services. Members receive additional content,
discounts,and access to me with call-in days,
conference calls,and an unbelievable "members
only" webpage of the best we have to offer.
Monthly or annual subscriptions are available.
Here are just a few of the benefits:

–Consulting call-in days
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–Copies of books, reports, and whitepapers
–Member's Only website

Don't let this ship sail without you!
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POPULAR WEB PAGES

>Blog
http://chartcourse.blogspot.com/

>Training programs and workshops
http://www.chartcourse.com/workshops.html

>Employee Retention
http://www.Highretention.com

>On-Line and Classroom Learning Programs
http://www.chartcourse.com/supervisortraining.html

>The BEST SELLING Icebreaker Book
http://www.chartcourse.com/book_energizers.html

>Management Profiles and Pre-Employment
Assessments http://www.behaviorprofile.com

>360 Assessments
http://www.chartcourse.com/360assessment.html

>Idea/suggestion Programs
http://www.chartcourse.com/bright-ideas-employee
suggestion-program.html

>Customer Service Training Programs
http://www.chartcourse.com/captainscustomerservice
.html

>Free Problem Solving Articles & Resource Center
http://chartcourse.com/articleheadpage.htm

>Special Reports
http://www.chartcourse.com/captainsreports.htm

>Special Deals
http://www.chartcourse.com/captainsspecialdeals.ht
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and coworkers.

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+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Copyright 2007, CYC International

This publication and the Navigator Newsletter
is provided by Chart Your Course International.

Published by Greg Smith
Chart Your Course International Inc.
Phone: 770-860-9464/800-821-2487
Address: 2814 Hwy 212, Conyers, GA. 30094

http://www.chartcourse.com
http://www.highretention.com
http://www.behaviorprofile.com

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In fact, there is a "direct link between performance and the number of
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STUPID THINGS BUSINESSES DO TO RUN OFF GOOD EMPLOYEES

Author and Consultant, Gregory Smith to Speak at SHRM Conference in
Atlanta

Atlanta, Ga. (September 7, 2007) ~ The Society for Human Resource
Management (SHRM) ~ Atlanta is pleased to announce Gregory P. Smith will
present at the 17th Annual Southeast Human Resource Conference in
Atlanta, Georgia on Monday, October 15, 2007. He is speaking on employee
retention, employee recruitment, and employee engagement. Smith's is a
sought after conference speaker. His inspirational speaking style and
leadership experience will captivate the audience and provide valuable
information to all who attend.

Smith is the founder and president of Chart Your Course International
Inc., a professional development training organizational focusing on
employee retention. Greg says, "Most businesses are oblivious to their
own stupid policies and procedures that force good employees to quit."
"Another reason there is high turnover is no one assumes responsibility.
Businesses waste billions of dollars replacing people, instead of placing
effort retaining them," says Smith.

Smith has guided hundreds of businesses with measurable improvements in
reduced employee turnover, increased sales, and better customer service
leading to long-term prosperity. One of the workforce trends Greg talks
about is the use of online employee selection assessments.

Smith's hard work and dedication led him to earn the Order of Military
Medical Merit; a listing in the Harvard University's International
Directory of Management Scholars; and the honor of being selected as one
of the nation's Top Ten "Rising Stars" in human resource management by
the Human Resource Executive magazine.

Greg served on the Board of Examiners for the Malcolm Baldrige National
Quality Award. This award is presented by the President of the United
States each year and is the nation's highest honor for business
excellence. Smith began his career on the front line as an U.S. Army
officer. He was a management consultant to military generals, and played
a major role in the largest organizational transformation in U.S. history
including efforts spearheaded by the Vice President of the United States.

Smith is able to spread his wealth of knowledge throughout the world as
the author of numerous books, audios, videos, and leadership and
management development programs. He is the publisher of the Navigator
Newsletter; and has been featured in USA Today, HR Magazine, Business
Week, Christian Science Monitor, President & CEO, Boston Globe,
Kiplinger's Personal Finance, and others. He has authored eight books
including his latest, 401 Proven Ways to Retain Your Best Employees.

The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) is the world's largest
human resource management association, and is dedicated to promoting the
use of sound and ethical human resource management practices in the
profession, to being the voice of the profession on human resource
management issues, to facilitating the development and guiding the
direction of the human resource profession, and to establishing,
monitoring, and updating standards for the profession.

Contact: Jan King
E-mail: jan@chartcourse.com
Website: www.chartcourse.com
Phone: (800) 821-2487 (770) 860-9464Greg's new book:
401 Proven Ways to Retain Your Best Employees
http://www.401-provenways.html

Executive Coaching

I know you realize how competitive the business world is. In order to get
ahead, you have to have knowledge — specialized knowledge. Studies
repeatedly show people that succeed in life have made their development
top priority. Unfortunately, only a few organizations invest their
resources in your personal or professional development. If you are going
to get ahead, you have to take responsibility for your success.

If you have enjoyed my Navigator Newsletter, website, lessons, and
articles, then you will benefit from my special member's only Voyageur
Business Coaching Program.

Executive coaching is fast becoming a valuable necessity for many
business leaders.

I can help you succeed

I want to provide you a special opportunity to move to a higher level of
personal and professional excellence with our business coaching program.
Each year I receive thousands of requests from people asking for my
advice. It is impossible for me to respond to every request. So I have
created this executive coaching program.

Whether you are wanting to become a better leader, start or grow your
business, or learn how to create a high performance organization that
attracts, retains, and engages its employees — this special program has
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Greg

http://www.ChartCourse.com
http://www.Highretention.com
http://www.BehaviorProfile.com

"Management is a 8:00 to 5:00 obligation, but LEADERSHIP is a 24
hour-a-day responsibility."

Greg,

Here are some comments on your latest article

THE SINKING OF THE TITANIC:
An Analogy of Failed Leadership

Captain Smith today epitomizes too many individuals holding place in
business. I appreciated your lessons learned from the Titanic. Here are a
few of mine to add to your collection.

Acknowledge reality: put to sea with enough lifeboats to save the
passengers and crew.

Manage risk: think through, train and perform procedures, including
disaster recovery.

Maintain judgment: avoid acquiescing to upper management when they'd have
you blindly steam full speed ahead through an ice field at night simply
to grab a headline.

Believe your experts: especially when they spell out for you the laws of
physics.

Know your limitations: stay within your operating envelope rather than
try to travel faster than your (relatively) small rudders will allow you
to turn from danger.

Lead always: leaders don't retreat to their wheelhouse to perish in
silence; they lead people, even in – especially through – loss.

Best Regards,
Bruce

www.alderonconsulting.com.